Browsed by
Tag: lost highway

unused roads

Bagley Lost Highway

Bagley Lost Highway

There’s an abandoned stretch of road sandwiched between US Highway 2 and Airport Drive on the outskirts of Bagley, Minnesota. A visitor to this website suggested this place to us after seeing our post on the lost highway in what was once McHugh, Minnesota, near Detroit Lakes.

Bagley Lost Highway
Image/Google Earth

Based on the map, it looks like US Highway 2 was realigned at some point, leaving this stretch of highway abandoned. If someone knows the details, please leave a comment.

Bagley Lost Highway

Bagley Lost Highway

This abandoned road stretches about six-tenths of a mile and parallels the railroad line.

Bagley Lost Highway

In North Dakota, we photographed another lost highway, created by a man-made flood.

Bagley Lost Highway

Photos by Troy Larson, copyright Sonic Tremor Media

A Haunting Abandoned Port of Entry in Noyes, Minnesota

A Haunting Abandoned Port of Entry in Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes, Minnesota is the most northwestern settlement in Minnesota.  It sits right on the Canadian border, and just across the Red River from Pembina, North Dakota, two miles west.  Although there are inhabited farmsteads in the area, there are very few residents (we only saw two inhabited places) in the actual town, largely due to the closure of the former Port of Entry station from Emerson, Manitoba.

In 2003, the Canadian government closed the Emerson Port of Entry.  Three years later, the United States closed the Noyes station, shuttering this border crossing for good and moving operations west to Pembina.  Near the end of its life, this station handled three trucks, three trains, fifty vehicles, and 154 passengers per day.

Noyes, Minnesota

We’d be willing to bet that despite this border station being abandoned, those cameras are still feeding video.

Noyes, Minnesota

At the time of our visit in 2013, the building was for sale. UPDATE: In August of 2014, an unknown bidder purchased the property in a government auction with a high bid of $52,113.

Noyes, Minnesota

Within sixty seconds of our arrival at the border, a US Border Patrol truck showed up and checked us out. We don’t really know if it was just a coincidence, or if they’re really that vigilant.

Noyes, Minnesota

Looking south from the Canadian point-of-view. The hazy sky cast a kind of weird light on the scene.

Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes, Minnesota

Whoever bought this got a sweet eight-stall garage.

Noyes, Minnesota

It’s not hard to imagine an episode of some science fiction show set in this place. An exhausted group of survivors stumbles upon this former port of entry, with burned-out cars stretching to the horizon. They wander between the lines of vehicles, forced to face the reality of families who were waiting here to cross the border when the final apocalypse came. In reality, this is the former Noyes, Minnesota border crossing, closed after a real-life apocalypse, 9/11, rendered the Port of Entry obsolete.

Noyes, Minnesota

This small stone obelisk marks the US/Canadian border.

Noyes, Minnesota

A locked gate blocks the road to Emerson and a closed Canadian port.

Noyes, Minnesota

Three steps through that gap and we would be illegally in Canada.

Noyes, Minnesota

Fargo resident James Sprague explained these ‘tracks’ in the road to us: These tar covered lines in the pavement are likely from inductance sensing loops. They detect the changes in magnetic field caused by a vehicle, person or anything with iron/steel content crossing over them. Most common applications are ground loops for traffic control signals and perimeter monitoring in security systems.

Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes, Minnesota

This former roadside garden and flag pole is barely recognizable after only seven years of abandonment.

Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes, Minnesota

In your mind’s eye, you can imagine the vehicles that once lined up on busy holiday weekends with their windows down and the radio playing, families heading to a favorite destination across the border… now only a memory.

Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes, Minnesota

Back in the day, this probably would have been your last chance to get gas before entering Canada and paying by the liter.

Noyes, Minnesota

Noyes, Minnesota

The Noyes depot is still in operation under the command of the Pembina Port of Entry staff. Trains coming from Canada are processed here.

We don’t really have an explanation for it, but we left with a jittery kind of uneasy feeling after visiting Noyes. It also reminded us of another closed border crossing we once visited — Northgate, North Dakota.

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright © 2013 Sonic Tremor Media



Join 756 followers.

McHugh: Part Two

McHugh: Part Two

We followed Old Highway 10 to the southeast and discovered the spot where it intersects with the present highway 10.  Note the double lanes crossing from right to left.  Traffic speeds by all day, oblivious to this passing lane.

This short stretch is right out in the open and visible from Highway 10 as you approach Detroit Lakes from the east.

This is our third gallery of stuff from the lost highway. Go back and read from the beginning.

Photos by Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

McHugh: Part One

McHugh: Part One

This is a closed section of Old Highway 10 near Detroit Lakes.  It was bypassed and abandoned when Highway 10 was widened and improved.

Terry and I made a trip to the “Lost Highway’ in May of 2011.  The buds were just barely showing on the trees after a cold spring.  Within moments of our arrival, the owner showed up, graciously gave us permission to photograph the property, and clued us in to the history of the place.

This section of old highway 10 is one of the last remnants of a railroad stop known as McHugh, Minnesota.  He also told us one of the final standing structures from the town that was once McHugh collapsed in the winter of 2010 under heavy snow.

A vacant home stares down the railroad tracks from a ridge overlooking McHugh.

I had explored this part of the Lost Highway before, in the fall of 2010.  You can see the pictures from that visit here.  However I was unaware there was another section of Old Highway 10 yet to be photographed.  See it in part two.

Photos by Troy Larson and Terry Hinnenkamp, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC

US 10: Vanishing Lost Highway

US 10: Vanishing Lost Highway

This is the former US Highway 10 near Detroit Lakes.  It was closed in the seventies when Highway 10 was widened to four lanes, leaving this stretch blocked-off and abandoned.

Old Highway 10

Old Highway 10

Today, deer and snowmobiles are the only traffic.  These photos were taken in the fall of 2010.

Old Highway 10

Through every crack in the pavement, nature intrudes.

Old Highway 10

The hike through here is effortless and the photo opportunities in the fall are incredible.  I had to ask around on my Facebook for directions, but it was pretty easy to find with a little help from Google Earth.

Old Highway 10

We photographed another lost highway near Bagley, and one in North Dakota, created by a man-made flood.

Old Highway 10

In another century, this highway will be virtually indistinguishable from the landscape.

Old Highway 10

This visit to the lost highway was in the fall of 2010 and I was unaware of a deeper history waiting to be discovered.  In the spring of 2011, we would find out this was much more than simply a closed section of blacktop.  Continue the story here.

Photos by Troy Larson, copyright Sonic Tremor Media LLC